Young adults’ experience of responsible service practice in NSW: An update

Researchers

  1. Ms Linda Scott, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research
  2. Dr Neil Donnelly, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research and National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology
  3. Dr Suzanne Poynton, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research
  4. Professor Don Weatherburn, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research

Summary

This 2006 study examines changes in intoxication levels and the experience of responsible service practice initiatives among 18-39 year olds drinking at licensed premises in NSW. The changes were measured since a similar 2002 study by BOCSAR.

Since the previous study was conducted, the NSW Government instituted a range of initiatives to encourage responsible service of alcohol (RSA) on licensed premises. It was important to check whether these initiatives led to an improvement.

Outcomes

This study found there was no significant change in the proportion of patrons reporting at least one of five signs of intoxication, with a modest increase in the provision of RSA initiatives. There was a reduction in the proportion of patrons at licensed premises reporting three or more signs of intoxication from 18.9% in 2002 to 14.6% in 2006. Of those reporting three or more signs of intoxication, there was a significant increase in those reporting at least one RSA measure: with significant increases in service refusal, having staff suggest to them they stop drinking, and advising on or organising transport home.

The likelihood of an intoxicated young adult receiving an RSA intervention improved from one in ten in 2002, to one in four in 2006. This represents a modest improvement with respect to the more overtly intoxicated persons. These changes are encouraging but there is clearly room for further improvement.

References

Scott, L, Donnelly, N, Poynton, S & Weatherburn, D 2007 Young adults’ experience of responsible service practice in NSW: An update. Alcohol Studies Bulletin 9. Sydney: NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research.

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