The Australian alcohol treatment outcome measure

Researchers

  1. Ms Melanie Simpson, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC), University of New South Wales
  2. Dr Peter Lawrinson, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC), University of New South Wales
  3. Professor Jan Copeland, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC), University of New South Wales
  4. Mr Peter Gates, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC), University of New South Wales

Summary

The aim of this project was to develop and test a suitable standard tool ‘the Australian Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure’ (AATOM) to measure the outcome of alcohol treatment to serve the needs of health professionals and their clients, policy makers, funding bodies, and the research community.

Designed for use by researchers and clinicians, AATOM allows meaningful treatment comparisons to be made and easier interpretation of results from diverse outcome studies, leading to improvements in the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of research.

The project developed and tested three draft AATOM instruments: AATOM-C, Australian Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure for Clinicians; AATOM-R, Australian Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure for Researchers, developed for use by the research community and is considerably more detailed than the AATOM-C; and E-AATOM, an electronic version of the Australian Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure.

Outcomes

The results of the study demonstrated that the AATOM-C is, overall, a valid and reliable instrument, taking an average of 11 minutes to administer. It has the potential to be a very useful clinical tool for those working within the alcohol treatment field. It can assist with treatment planning and tracking of client progress throughout the course of treatment and after treatment completion.

The AATOM instruments and book are published by, and available for purchase from NDARC.

References

Simpson, M, Lawrinson, P, Copeland, J & Gates, P 2009 The Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure (ATOM): A new clinical tool for standardising outcome measurement for alcohol treatment. Addictive Behaviours, 34(1): 121-124.
Simpson, M, Lawrinson, P, Copeland, J & Gates, P 2007 The Australian Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure (AATOM-C): Psychometric properties. Sydney: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre.
Simpson, M, Copeland, J & Lawrinson, P 2008 The Australian Alcohol Treatment Measure (AATOM-C): Findings of the 12-month feasibility study. Sydney: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre.
Thomson, N, Devaney, M, Simpson, M, Talko, T, Pahoki, S, & Ritter, A 2008 The Australian Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure (AATOM-R): Psychometric Properties, Melbourne: Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre.
Gates, P 2006 The Australian Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure d0 for Clinicians (AATOM-C). Meeting New Challenges: APSAD Conference. Cairns, 5-8 November.
Simpson, M, & Copeland, J 2008 The Australian Alcohol Treatment Outcome Measure for Clinicians (AATOM-C): psychometric properties and field testing, Australian Winter School, Brisbane, 12-14th May.

FARE continues to fund and undertake research that contributes to the knowledge-base about alcohol harms and strategies to reduce them.

This research is used to inform our approach to evidence-based alcohol policy development, ensuring that the solutions we are advocating for are informed by research. FARE’s research is also often quoted by governments, other not-for-profit organisations and researchers in public discussions about alcohol, demonstrating that FARE is seen as a leading source of information.

Join our mailing list

Latest research papers

Alcohol use and harm during COVID-19

This Report provides a snapshot of the recent available data on alcohol use and harm during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia, focusing on the period between March – May 2020.