Alcohol health labelling: Community perceptions of the FARE and DrinkWise model alcohol labels

Researcher

Galaxy Research

Summary

The report sought to determine people’s perspectives of the effectiveness of two alcohol labelling regimes, the FARE alcohol health warning labels and DrinkWise’s consumer information labels. The polling was carried out online among a permission based panel by Galaxy Research.

As part of the polling participants were asked to select the most superior labels against a set of criteria including: noticeability, comprehensibility of the message, capacity to raise awareness and prompt conversations about alcohol related harms, and impact on alcohol consumption. Throughout the questionnaire the labels were not attributed to FARE or DrinkWise.

The report found that the FARE labels were superior on all measures.

Outcomes

1. Comparison of FARE and DrinkWise pregnancy labels

People were shown the FARE pregnancy warning label ‘Drinking alcohol can harm your unborn baby’ and the DrinkWise pregnancy silhouette as applied to alcohol products and asked to select the superior label against three criteria.

  • 86% of people selected the FARE pregnancy warning label as being more likely to raise awareness of the harms of consuming alcohol while pregnant, while the remaining 14% of people selected the DrinkWise pregnancy label.
  • 84% of people selected the FARE pregnancy warning label as being more likely to prompt conversations about the risk of drinking alcohol during pregnancy, while the remaining 16% of people selected the DrinkWise pregnancy label.
  • 85% of people selected the FARE pregnancy warning label as being more effective in preventing women from drinking alcohol while pregnant, while the remaining 15% of people selected the DrinkWise pregnancy label.

2. Comparison of FARE and DrinkWise labels on alcohol misuse among young people

People were shown the FARE warning label ‘Drinking alcohol damages the young developing brain and the DrinkWise label ‘Kids and alcohol don’t mix’ as applied to alcohol products and asked to select the superior label against three criteria.

  • 83% of people selected the FARE young people health warning label as being more likely to raise awareness about the harms that can result from young people consuming alcohol, while the remaining 17% of people selected the DrinkWise young people label.
  • 82% of people selected the FARE young people health warning label as being more likely to prompt conversations about alcohol consumption among young people, while the remaining 18% selected the DrinkWise label.
  • 83% of people selected the FARE young people health warning label as being more likely to result in young people drinking less alcohol, while the remaining 17% selected the DrinkWise label.

3. Comparison of complete series of FARE and DrinkWise labels

People were shown the series of FARE warning labels and the series of DrinkWise labels as applied to alcohol products and asked to select the superior label against three criteria.

  • 89% of people selected the FARE series of health warning labels as being more likely to raise awareness of alcohol-related harms, while the remaining 11% selected the DrinkWise labels.
  • 88% of people selected the FARE series of health warning labels as being more likely to prompt conversations about alcohol-related harms, while the remaining 12% selected the DrinkWise labels.
  • 88% of people selected the FARE series of warning labels as being more likely to result in people drinking less alcohol, while 12% of people selected the DrinkWise labels.
  • 95% of people selected the FARE series of health warning labels as being more noticeable, while the remaining 5% selected the DrinkWise labels.
  • 91% of people selected the FARE series of warning labels as easier to understand, while the remaining 9% selected the DrinkWise labels.
  • 60% of people selected the FARE labels as telling them something they did not already know, while 10% of people selected the DrinkWise labels. People were also given the option to select ‘neither’ and a further 31% of people did this.

FARE continues to fund and undertake research that contributes to the knowledge-base about alcohol harms and strategies to reduce them.

This research is used to inform our approach to evidence-based alcohol policy development, ensuring that the solutions we are advocating for are informed by research. FARE’s research is also often quoted by governments, other not-for-profit organisations and researchers in public discussions about alcohol, demonstrating that FARE is seen as a leading source of information.

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